Color Blindness

Color blindness might not mean what you think. It actually has no relation to being blind and a very small number of people see the world entirely gray. Take the color deficiency screening below and view examples of what color blind or deficient individuals see.

In living color

Most people who are considered color blind have a color vision deficiency which means they can see colors, but they just see them a little differently. Colors may look faded or dull, or two different colors could look very similar. This happens because the cones in the eye are missing one or more of the light-sensitive pigments.1 Genetics are typically to blame, but sometimes age, diseases and medication can be the culprit.

Screening for color deficiencies

The most widely used screening test for color deficiencies is the Ishihara Color Vision Test. The test contains circular patterns comprised of many dots of various colors, brightness and sizes. Within the circle is a number. A color deficient person will either be unable to see the number or will see a different number than the one seen by a person with normal color vision.2

How do you see color?

Select the number you see in the circle to the left to test your color acuity.

This test is not medical advice. A complete diagnosis of color vision deficiency is not possible using online testing–consult an eye care professional for more information and accurate testing.

You have normal vision

Based on our results, you can see all the colors of the rainbow and have normal color vision. You were able to detect the shapes in nearly all the questions. You fall into the majority of 92% of men and over 99% of women who don't have color blindness

If you still have questions or concerns about your vision, you should be sure to consult an eye doctor. Schedule an eye exam today.

A complete diagnosis of color vision deficiency is not possible using online testing–consult an eye care professional for more information and accurate testing.

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You may be a protan

Based on your results you may have protanomaly. This means the red cones in your eye are not able to register that color or shades of that color. Therefore an orange appears not as bright and maybe a little yellow and flamingos may look gray or brown. You may confuse colors like green and yellow or red and black.3

For a proper diagnosis, you should be sure to consult an eye doctor. Schedule an eye exam today.

A complete diagnosis of color vision deficiency is not possible using online testing–consult an eye care professional for more information and accurate testing.

Share your results

You may be a tritan

Based on your results you may have tritanomaly. This means the blue cones in your eye are not able to register that color or shades of that color. Therefore bananas appear pink and the sky may look gray. You may confuse colors like orange with purple and pink or blue and green.3

A complete diagnosis of color vision deficiency is not possible using online testing–consult an eye care professional for more information and accurate testing.

Share your results

Your results are inconclusive

Based on your results you weren’t able to spot the correct number across different screen plates. You may have trouble differentiating colors and hues across the spectrum.

A complete diagnosis of color vision deficiency is not possible using online testing–consult an eye care professional for more information and accurate testing.

Share your results

Types of color vision deficiencies

The cones in our eyes determine the different levels of color deficiencies - from seeing no color at all (which is rare) down to just slightly seeing one or two colors differently. There are two main types of color vision deficiencies that represent how our eyes respond to blue, green, and red light.

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Deutan

A deutan is a person who has either deuteranopia or deuteranomaly. This type of colorblindness or deficiency impacts green cones. In the total absence of green cones, green looks beige and red and orange look brown. If there is just a deficiency yellow and green appear more red. Purple and blue look similar too. Deuteranomaly is the most common color vision deficiency impacting nearly 5% of males and less than 1% of females.2

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Protan

A protan is a person who has either protanopia or protanomaly. This type of color blindness or deficiency impacts red cones. In the total absence of red cones, red and purple look brownish or can even appear black. Green and orange look yellow. If there is just a deficiency, red and orange appears to have a green tint and many colors like red, orange, purple and green are not as vibrant.2

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Tritan

Tritan is a person who has either tritanomaly or tritanopia. This type of color blindness impacts the blue cone cells and is very rare. In the total absence of blue cones yellow looks like violet or light gray and blue looks like green. If there is just a deficiency, blue looks greener and yellow can look like red or pink.2

1 Color Vision Deficiency https://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/eye-and-vision-problems/glossary-of-eye-and-vision-conditions/color-deficiency
2 Facts about Color Blindess https://nei.nih.gov/health/color_blindness/facts_about
3 Types of Color Blindness http://www.colourblindawareness.org/colour-blindness/types-of-colour-blindness
4 “OneSight Community Vision Care Participant Training Guide” 21 Aug 2015